Share Our Math Games: Google+

Blog

Measuring Up to Abe Lincoln {Measurement Activity}

Logo_

Logo_

Cover Page

Buy this on Selz
Selz powering ecommerce websites

Students will work in pairs. They each need pencils, rulers, bulletin board paper (one sheet for each student big enough to trace bodies), a life-size cut out of Abe Lincoln (Draw and measure this, or ask the art teacher for help!) hung up on the wall as if standing so students can see how tall he actually is.

Review with students how you drew Abe Lincoln and measured his height with a ruler. Review units of measurement (inches, cm, feet, meters). Also, ask students if they know how tall they are.

Have them guess how tall Abe Lincoln is, and share with them that he was 6 feet 4 inches tall and the tallest president ever. This was a time when the average height for men was 5 feet 6 inches. At age 17, he was already this tall, and a great athlete. He weighed between 160 and 185 pounds, so he was very thin for his height.

Ask a few students to stand next to your cut tout on the wall and compare heights. Arrange students into pairs and have them take turns tracing each other on butcher paper. Have them measure their height from head to toe in inches. (Older students might convert that height to feet and inches). Each student should write his or her height on their cut out.

Have students subtract their height in inches from Abe’s height in inches. Older students might subtract their height in feet and inches from Abe’s height of 6’ 4”. Finally, students can Dress their cut outs and decorate them, and they can be displayed in the hallways alongside Abe!

You can also download a PDF version of this game to file away for later here on my site or on TeachersPayTeachers.

Measurement and Science, Plant Growth {Measurement Activity}

Cover page

Text

Cover page

Buy this on Selz
Selz powering ecommerce websites
Each student will need a milk carton filled with good soil, bean seeds, string to support the plants, graph paper to record results, a pencil and a ruler to measure the growth. You need a sunny window to put the plants near as well.

Have each student plant their seed one inch deep, one per container.

Place your containers in a sunny window. Water the seeds daily or every other day. Poke holes in the bottom of the milk cartons (this will keep roots from rotting).
You can place cartons inside pie tins to catch excess water.

Lead students in preparing graphs on their paper to record days, inches and/or meters of growth. Begin measuring when you first see growth.

Attach a string to each container (a support string of several feet is necessary as bean plants usually climb the string. Bush beans will not climb but will need support).

Compare the growth of the plants using student’s graphs. Have them answer questions such as, which is taller, shorter, tallest, shortest, etc. Which plant grew the fastest or slowest?

You can also download a PDF version of this game to file away for later here on my site or on TeachersPayTeachers.

Using the Metric System {Measurement Activity}

Logo

Logo

Cover Page

Buy this on Selz
Selz powering ecommerce websites
Give students these materials: metric ruler, crayons or markers, pencils, paper.

Materials you will need: Chalkboard, chalk, large piece of construction paper or butcher paper, graph paper.

Divide your class into groups of four and, first, have students measure and record the length of each member’s smile in their group. Have them compare their results with all members of the group. Students return to seats as you record each of their measurements on the board. Students need to record the results of each student’s smile as well at their seat.

The students need to check their results against the results of the rest of the group.

Have students:
Order measurements from least to greatest
Graph the results
Find the sum of results
Create one long smile that is the result of all the smile lengths added together.

You can also download a PDF version of this game to file away for later here on my site or on TeachersPayTeachers.

Make a Thermometer {Measurement Activity}

Logo_2

Logo_2

Cover Page

Buy this on Selz
Selz powering ecommerce websites
Students will use white paper to make a thermometer. Have them writer the numbers the same as they would see them on a real thermometer. Using red crayons, they will color the paper thermometer to the proper level to represent the real temperature.

Organize each student’s thermometer as a wall display from lowest temperatures to highest temperatures.

You can also download a PDF version of this game to file away for later here on my site or on TeachersPayTeachers.

Cubes Investigation, Cubic Growth {Measurement Game}

Cover Page

Logo
Cover Page
Buy this on Selz
Selz powering ecommerce websites

Students will work in groups to find a solution to this problem:

How many 1x1x1 cubes are painted on three faces, two faces, one face, or no faces when the following occurs?

Different sized cubes are constructed from unit cubes
The surface areas are painted
The larger cubes are taken apart

Place students in groups and give each group a large quantity of unit cubes, graph paper, and colored pencils or markers.

Hold a cube up and tell students it is the cube’s first birthday. Write down words that describe the cube, like number of corners, faces and edges). Have them build what a cube may look like on its second birthday.

Hold up a unit cube. Tell students this is a cube on its first birthday. Ask students to describe the cube (eight corners, six faces, twelve edges). Have them build the third, fourth and fifth birthday of the cube, then ask this question for them to solve:

If this cube was ten years old, dipped into paint, dried and taken apart into the unit cubes, how many cubes have three faces, two faces, one face or no faces painted? Have them draw the cube on each of its birthdays up to ten and look for patterns.

Have them also record the exponents for the number of cubes painted on three faces, two, one and no faces. Then, they need to display their findings in graph form, once again looking for patterns. They should notice the following:

The 3 painted faces are always the corners – 8 on a cube, cubes with two painted faces occur on the edges between the corner and increase by 12 each time. Cubes with one face painted occur as squares on the 6 faces of the original, first cube. The cubes with no faces painted are the cube within the cube.

You can also download a PDF version of this game to file away for later here on my site or on TeachersPayTeachers.

How Cold is it? {Measurement Activity}

Logo

Cover Page

Buy this on Selz
Selz powering ecommerce websites

Place a thermometer outside a window, or just outside a doorway that is close to your classroom. Each day, have a student check the temperature, after they understand how to read a thermometer.

To analyze temperatures, do the following activities with students:

Create a chart students can fill in each day with the day’s temperature.

After a certain number of days (20 to 30 maybe), graph the temperatures. If there are enough of the same temperatures, construct a line plot graph with them.

Describe what it feels like outside when the temperatures are in this range, and estimate what they may be in a different season.

Find the highest temperature for the entire 2 weeks.
Find the lowest temperature for the entire 2 weeks.
Find the average temperature.

You can also download a PDF version of this game to file away for later here on my site or on TeachersPayTeachers.

Measurement Chain {Math Game}

Cover Page

Text_2

Cover Page

Buy this on Selz
Selz powering ecommerce websites
You will need to pair your students. Give each pair one sheet of construction paper, scissors and glue. Students work together to figure out how to use the sheet of construction paper to make the longest chain possible out of their sheet of construction paper.

You may want to show them how to make a paper chain. When students are finished making their chains, take them outside to measure them.

Allow student groups to tell you their measurement as you record them on the board. Talk about strategies used, and graph them. Make one graph for the number of links, and another for the length of the chains. Students should be able to see that it doesn’t matter how many links you have, but how long they are instead.

 

 

You can also download a PDF version of this game to file away for later here on my site or on TeachersPayTeachers.

What Measure Should I Use? {Mental Math Activity}

Cover Page

TextBox
Cover PageHere is a fun game to play in class. Tell students that you want to measure something and have them tell you which units you should use as a measure for problems involving both weight and linear measure.

For example, let’s say you wanted to measure the weight of a cow. Should you measure the cow in pounds or ounces?

What if you wanted to measure the weight of a mouse? Pounds or ounces?

What if you wanted to measure the length of a car? Should you use feet or inches? What about the weight of a car? Pounds or ounces?

Once you get students to think about these measurements and how they apply, start getting them to think about comparisons. For example, which do they think would weigh more, the car or the cow? Which weighs more, a hummingbird or a mouse?

Have your facts ready so that students can see the fun comparisons. For example, an average car weighs 4,000 pounds and an average cow weighs 1,500 pounds. Would four cows weigh more or less than one car?

These guessing games are just for fun but they increase your students’ number sense and give them a feeling for whether a measurement is correct or not.

You can also download a PDF version of this game to file away for later here on my site or on TeachersPayTeachers

Buy this on Selz
Selz powering ecommerce websites
MentalMathBundle-ClickHere

Number Patterns {Mental Math Activity}

Cover Page

Text
Cover PageOne of the interesting ways you can get your elementary students to work with mental math is to use visual patterns. For example, if you take all the face cards out of a set of playing cards, you’ll have the number cards remaining. Take a couple of these decks and cover up the numbers and the small designation of the suit. What you’ll have left is just the number pattern on the card. You can then use these cards as flash cards to get students to use their mental math muscles.

There are many different ways you can use these. You can begin by just flashing a single ca
rd and having them call out the number. Then they can graduate to giving you the sum or difference very quickly as you flash up two cards and tell them the operation.

After playing around with addition and subtraction, you can have them move on to multiplication and division, which will end up being a fraction representation.

You can also extend this activity into using the cards to represent digits in a number that has place value. For example, give them 3-4 cards and have them arrange them to represent the smallest number possible or the largest number possible.

Lots of fun with mental math!

You can also download a PDF version of this game to file away for later here on my site or on TeachersPayTeachers

Buy this on Selz
Selz powering ecommerce websites


Card_black_8

MentalMathBundle-ClickHere

Different Ways to Pay 25 cents {Mental Math Activity}

Cover Page

Text
Cover PageBring in a huge jar of pennies, nickels, dimes, and quarters. Have the students work at one large table or break them up in groups with four participants in each group. Each student in a group will be in charge of one of the types of coins.

The goal is to have the students come up with different groupings of these coins to add up to 25¢. There are lots of different ways to do it. For example, they could have 2 dimes and 5 pennies. They could have 25 pennies. They could have 2 nickels, 1 dime, and 5 pennies. They could have just one quarter.25pcs of penny

If students haven’t played much with coins, you’ll see that sometimes they don’t understand why
a dime has more
value than a nickel. It should be bigger, right? It’s good to have a brief discussion about the fact that the size of a coin isn't always an indicator of its value.

They should organize their finished combinations on a worksheet designed for this purpose or a flat tabletop. Once they have worked with the coins for awhile have them explain some of their finished combinations.

When they've mastered the combinations for 25¢, you can easily extend this activity by having students find combinations that yield 75¢ or $1.25.

You can also download a PDF version of this game to file away for later here on my site or on TeachersPayTeachers

Buy this on Selz
Selz powering ecommerce websites

MentalMathBundle-ClickHere